impart
mental health care

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Many of the children and youths in the community are dealing with life and/or psychological adversities in their daily lives. This has consequences on their mental wellness and in turn other aspects such as education, employment and social relationships. 

We are committed to improving mental wellness in children and youths in the community.

Project Cope​

Project Cope is a 6-months programme that involves Youth Advocates journeying alongside children and youths to learn adaptive coping strategies.

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Project Hope

Project Hope is a 6- to 9-months program that supports youths in the journey of equipping them with practical skills to empower them in terms of interests, education and/or employment.

 

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IMNA

IMNA (I’M Not Alone) is an outreach service which acts as the first line of response to youths facing psychological or life adversity. Under IMNA, volunteers—known as Youth Advocates (YAs)—will be matched to a child or youth to build motivation and instil readiness for change through Motivational Interviewing (MI).

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Advocacy

 

We engage in advocacy work to increase the accessibility of therapeutic resources through decommodification.

 

PROJECT COPE

Project Cope focuses on equipping children and youths aged 10 - 21 years old with healthy coping strategies in which they can use instead of maladaptive ones they might be using.

These coping skills support children and youths in managing intense emotions, living more fully in the present moment, communicating and expressing oneself effectively, and negotiating relationships.

Our Beneficiaries

Children & youth (10–21 years old)

  • No demographic restrictions
     

SYNC processes each case individually & consider clients who display any or more of the following:
 

  • Life-threatening behaviour—e.g., self-harm, suicide ideation/attempt(s), drunk driving

  • Therapy-interfering behaviour—e.g., not appearing for sessions, not doing assigned homework

  • Quality of life-interfering behaviour—e.g., substance use, high-risk sexual behaviour

  • Need for behavioural skills

Our Approach

All our Youth Advocates (YA) received intensive training in the provision of skills from a therapy modality called Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT).

Our Project Structure

Through 14 sessions over 6 months, YAs will equip children and youths with skills through the Intervention phase. Beyond the programme, YAs may explore with the clients whether to extend the programme by 2 months.

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PROJECT hope

Created for older youths between 14 to 24 years old, Project Hope aims to provide youths with a safe space to explore their future selves in terms of education and employment, such that mental strain from disengagement can be targeted.

Our Beneficiaries

Children & youth (14–24 years old)

  • No demographic restrictions
     

SYNC processes case individually & consider clients who display any or more of the following:
 

  • Openness to interest discovery

  • Interest in exploring & identifying educational or career paths

  • Need for resources & skill sets to strive toward a meaningful direction in life

  • Need for suitable & prosocial engagement in the community

Our Approach

Our Youth Advocates use a set of thoughtfully curated assessments and modules called FutureSelves. FutureSelves systematically supports individuals in identifying aspects like their strengths, fears, interests et cetera. Thereafter, Youth Advocates plan out a personalised programme and equip the youths with skills necessary in achieving their goals.

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About FutureSelves

Created and distributed by OPRA Psychology Group, FutureSelves is based on the theory of possible, future selves and psychology of behavioural change. It utilises an evidence-based approach and guides individuals in personal and career development. 

It includes an assessment portion as well as a set of modules, both of which are aimed at supporting individuals to make the link between the 4 key domains, namely:

  1. Skills & Interests,

  2. Personal Values & Beliefs,

  3. Career Options and

  4. Lifestyle Factors.

 

IMnA

Meaning behind IMNA

IMNA stands for "I'm not alone.". Embedded in its logo is another word "IMUA", which in Hawaiian means to move forward in strength.

What does IMNA do?

Viewed as the A&E unit in SYNC, all our referrals go through IMNA before getting allocated to other programmes or organisations. IMNA acts as an intermediary and provides incoming children and youths with a holding space, reducing waiting time or disengagement. During the 1 to 6 months that the child or youth is with IMNA, our goals are to build emotional safety, enhance resilience, and increase stabilisation. In addition, they also act as frontline volunteers who respond to life and psychological crises.

Our Beneficiaries

Children & youth (10–24 years old)

  • No demographic restrictions
     

SYNC processes case individually & consider clients who display any or more of the following:

  • Lack of future orientation

  • Disengaged in the community

  • Life-threatening behaviour—e.g., self-harm, suicide ideation/attempt(s), drunk driving

  • Therapy-interfering behaviour—e.g., not appearing for sessions, not doing assigned homework

  • Quality of life-interfering behaviour—e.g., substance use, high-risk sexual behaviour

  • Need for behavioural skills

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Our Approach

All Youth Advocates will undergo compulsory training in:

  • Psychological First Aid

  • Trauma-Informed Approaches

  • Youth Engagement Strategies

  • Digital Empathy

  • Crisis Management

Youth Advocates are also required to attend fortnightly supervision, alongside receiving constant support and guidance from the Volunteer Manager, Programme Managers, Managing Directors. Some YAs may be further equipped with other skills such as FutureSelves and Dialectical Behavioural Therapy skills, to better support the youths.

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ADVOCACY

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What is Advocacy?

Advocacy is about:

  • Identifying a problem that needs to change

  • Giving the people who are affected a platform

  • Coming up with a plan to tackle the problem

  • Influencing people with power, and convincing them to support your plan for change

What is Decommodification?

As presented by the Ministry of Health, the average overall median waiting time for new subsidised appointments across the public hospitals was 27 days to see a psychiatrist, and 28 days to see a psychologist in 2018. Accessibility to mental health services in today's context is greatly limited due to oversubscription and waiting times, as well as costs. 

SYNC hence aims to increase the accessibility of therapeutic resources through decommodification – which means that we are reversing the process of putting a hefty price tag on these valuable resources, and distributing them to the general public. This is done extensively via our social media, where we provide psychoeducation (education on mental health concepts), advocate, as well as equip the public with the same skills we do with our children and youths.

Our Voices

PART 1: SHAWAL

"For those who're scared or victims, that they know that they can seek help, because I've been both of them before - the victim and the at-risk person. You can seek help."

In this video, we spotlight 19-year old Shawal’s voice. Once an impulsive daredevil who chased the thrill of doing things that risked his life, Shawal now hopes to use his story to encourage others to change for the better.